Categories
Recent News

Who is Most at Risk of Contracting Dupuytren’s Contracture?

Post Date: November 5, 2020

Dupuytren’s Contracture is a bit of a hidden disease to most. It is not as common as other hand or finger infections that can be suffered, so it is not as familiar. Dupuytren’s Contracture starts as a hard nodule or lump in the palm of your hand. As the disease worsens and the nodule gets larger, it causes the fingers to bend into the hand’s center. It usually affects the ring and little finger but is known to be found in any fingers. The condition is generally pain-free but can make daily activities challenging to perform. The fingers’ unnatural bending makes grasping of objects impossible, as the infected finger cannot be opened. Let’s take a look at who is likely to suffer from Dupuytren’s Contracture:

Lineage:

Dupuytren’s Contracture is hereditary, being passed down from generation to generation. This of Northern European descent is most likely to suffer from the condition. This dates back to the days of the Vikings, who spread the disease throughout the region while traveling from country to country. The disease was so prevalent in Vikings that it is even known as Vikings Disease. Over the years, the disease made its way through Europe, eventually making it to the British Isles. The condition is also known as Celtic Hand in Great Britain, as it was more common in those of Celtic descent. 

Sex:

You are more likely to suffer from Dupuytren’s Contracture as a man than as a woman. The ratio of men with the disease in comparison to women is 4 to 1. There is no explanation for this, but it may be connected to lifestyle choices made by men. The severity of the condition is also far worse in men than in women, with more aggressive symptoms and more fingers being affected. Men tend to develop the disease in both their hands as they get older. 

Age:

People are more susceptible to Vikings Disease as they get older. People over the age of 50 are more likely to suffer from the condition, and the chances of contraction are greater as they age. As mentioned before, the disease is more common in men; women who suffer from Dupuytren’s Contracture tend to do so after menopause; however, there is no proof of this being connected to ovarian function. 

Drinking alcohol:

Although there is no actual cause of Dupuytren’s Contracture, it has been linked to a chemical imbalance in the body. Those who drink alcoholic beverages regularly tend to suffer from the condition more so than non-drinkers. Alcohol consumption is proven to trigger the disease. The symptoms of the disease are far more aggressive in someone who consumes alcohol regularly. 

Smoking cigarettes:

As with alcohol, there is a connection to smoking cigarettes and suffering from Dupuytren’s Contracture. Those who smoke cigarettes regularly are proven to be more likely to contract the disease than a non-smoker. It is said that the nicotine, coupled with the fact that smoking changes the blood vessels, can trigger the condition. Heavy smokers will usually have more severe symptoms and have symptoms in both hands. Smoking has more of an effect on the condition than alcohol consumption. 

Diabetes:

Dupuytren’s Contracture is considered to be one of the complications of diabetes. It is suggested that the use of insulin to treat diabetes may be in some way connected to the condition, but there is no solid evidence to support this theory. About 5% of Dupuytren’s Contracture patients also have diabetes. The condition is not to be confused with diabetic stiff hand syndrome, common in people with diabetes. Diabetic stiff hand syndrome will limit hand function and causes stiffness and discomfort. 

Ledderhose disease:

Ledderhose disease is Dupuytren’s Contracture of the feet. Much like Dupuytren’s Contracture, Ledderhose Disease is a rare condition that starts as hard nodules or lumps on the soles of one’s feet. This condition is also known to be hereditary and also connected to alcoholism and smoking. Those who suffer from Vikings disease are also prone to Ledderhose disease. 

Other conditions:

There is also a connection between Dupuytren’s disease and some other ailments. Liver disease sufferers are more susceptible to the condition, as are those who have epilepsy. Although epilepsy and seizures aren’t an actual cause, their medication is known to trigger the disease. Previous hand trauma is also connected with Dupuytren’s Contracture, again not being the cause but making the condition more aggressive and speeding up its development. 

 

How do you treat Dupuytren’s Contracture?

 

The most common treatment for Dupuytren’s Contracture is surgery. The surgeon will make a zigzag-shaped incision in the area and then remove the hardened tissue. This allows movement to return to the fingers. The surgery leaves an unsightly scar and takes a long time to heal completely. There is also a risk of tendon and nerve damage associated with an operation.

 

After surgery, a period of physiotherapy is usually necessary. Needle aponeurotomy is another form of treatment that is used for the disease. A doctor will insert a needle under the skin and move it around to break up the hardened tissue and allow movement to return to the fingers. Although no incision is made, this treatment is sometimes painful and will leave the hand and fingers feeling numb or with a tingling sensation. 

 

Doctors will also administer a steroid or cortisone injection to treat Celtic Hand. This injection can be painful and cause bleeding and swelling at the site. The injection will usually provide relief but is only a temporary treatment. If you are interested in non-surgical treatment for Dupuytren’s Contracture, then head over to Dupuytren – Cure, where you can find the most highly recommended treatment on the market.

 

The Dupuytren’s tape is the best at home Dupuytren’s Contracture treatment you will find. Not only is it easy to use and cost-effective, but it will allow the use of the hand. A splint or brace is often recommended treatment for the condition but can be cumbersome and make daily tasks extremely difficult to perform. The tape allows the use of the hand to continue while stretching out the affected finger.

 

The tape encourages blood flow to the affected area, which will aid in a natural Dupuytren’s Contracture treatment, as opposed to surgery. With its lightweight design, the tape can be worn all day and night without interfering with the use of the hand or other fingers. What makes the tape such a great non-surgical treatment for Dupuytren’s Contracture is that it has no side effects and begins working after only one use.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *