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Treatment Options for Dupuytren’s Contracture

Though many people never get to the stage of Dupuytren’s Contracture becoming serious, risk should be reduced as advanced stages of this disease can be difficult. 

A wide number of Dupuytren’s treatment options are available when it comes to the disease.

 

Home Treatment Methods – Safe and Affordable:

In recent years more viable options for treatment have also been developed:

  • Dupuytren’s Wand: The Dupuytren’s Wand has proven to be a quick and inexpensive solution for Dupuytren’s Contracture, which can easily be used from home. It is effective in restoring movement of your hand and delays the need for surgery.   It is especially effective in the earlier stages of Dupuytren’s Disease.
  • Dupuytren’s Tape: Working with the wand, or independently of the wand, Dupuytren’s Tape is again a great home treatment for the disease. Quick, cheap, and easy to use, the tape provides a gentle stretch to your finger, allowing your hand to achieve a better range of motion without restricting grasping.

Other Treatment Methods – Risk Factors Involved:

 

  • Injections: Corticosteroids are injected into the nodule of the fascia. Any tenderness is reduced, and further thickening of the tissue is delayed.
  • Splinting: It is a forceful stretching of the contracted finger and is not typically recommended. It can cause further damage or injury to the finger and is not known to be helpful.
  • Fasciotomy: Fasciotomy is a popular surgical treatment method in which an incision in the palm is made, and the thickened cords of tissue are divided.
  • Subtotal Palmar Fasciectomy: This is another surgical method in which incision is made in the palm, and abnormal tissues and cords are removed in the process just enough to straighten the fingers.

Risk Factors Involved:

Many risk factors come in with these procedures:

  • Long healing and recovery time
  • Pain and scarring
  • Potential damage to the nerves or blood vessels
  • Post-procedure infection
  • Loss of sensation or loss of viability of the finger

These treatment methods also require greater wound care and take a lot of time and effort for physical therapy. 

 

 

 

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